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13 days ago

Best of Persona (NBA) - Chad Wittman

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Draymond Green calls out double standards in NBA's treatment of players... How can the NBA fix it?

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Okay, Okay. Eso I answered this question solo, and I think like for me, he's clearly emotional about this issue, which is totally fine. But he is frustrated. I think about two things. One is sort of the relationship between the ownership and the players union and what that structure is like, which, you know, that's one argument, and the second one is sort of like, how media slash culture slash You know, MBA Twitter reacts to these situations, right? And his rant touches on both and kind of jumps between those two and the different examples drumming Harden, Irving all jump across those. And so, like, I understand his like frustration with the media and the culture in the MBA. Twitter, like I get that. But there's like there's by definition, no remedy to that, right? If people think James Harden is lazy because he doesn't want to play in Houston anymore and like like, that's just popular opinion, and so he's just sort of critiquing society, which is like, Okay, like, what do we do about that? But then when you get in and that's in both of the business side of it, like he really didn't have anything specific that you could really nail down to be like. Okay, well, so do we get rid of guaranteed contracts? Do we get rid of players being able, like signing you no longer than one year Contracts? Like, how do you How do you structurally change these agreements Where the team is saying, Okay, I want to give you $200 million to play here for five years. Does that sound good? They're like, I don't know, like, all right, fine. I will give you $130 million guaranteed no matter what. And then the other 70 million, you gotta earn you. Will you take that? And he's like, Yeah, okay, fine. I'm excited to be in Milwaukee for five years. Boom. On the next year, like, I don't really want to do it. Like I just don't understand how, like, how you solve that. So that's my rant, right? I mean, I agree 100% with you, and I think what the n b a community as a whole. At least the fan base is thinking in this regard is that if you are going to opt into a contract, that's literally gonna pay you millions of dollars. You need to be able to hold up to the scrutiny that you might get from the outside in e mean at the end of the day, these guys air fulfilling their dreams and making more money than pretty much the entire population in doing it. So obviously there's gonna be some sort of draw back to that. And I think that's what when I'm looking at it from an outside lens like you said, there's no way to ever get rid of it. But the truth is, I mean, these guys are in such a great position that they should be able to hold up to a little bit of scrutiny as well. Yeah, I mean. And then he made a comment in there, too. He was like, You know, do you expect us to stay in in physical and mental shape, to play basketball, the high level year round, regardless of whether or not we're active or you want to trade me or I want to play? They're all that, and I would reflect that question and say, Well, okay, what about all the G leaders that keep their bodies in shape? What about the guys that are trying to stay on rosters overseas right now. They have what you are talking about. 2 10 x the problem, right? They they literally have to stay in shape regardless of a contract regard. And they actually have to give up finishing a college degree. They have to give up starting a job in the real world because they're holding on to this dream that that maybe someday they'll get a million dollar paycheck in the n b A. And you're like man like I have to stay in shape. Eso that the Warriors can effectively trade me. It's like like like, man, that's just like it's a It's a shortsighted view of the problem. Now again, I think there are things that could be done to improve. Like I think the fact like I what I would actually go around focusing on is get rid of the salary cap in the MBA because I think that this conversation is partly created because the players union has set up a high floor for the lower end of the league, but then, as capped the high end of the league, right? So if LeBron James is on a $600 million deal to the Lakers. I think the conversation is a lot more simple to be like, Okay, LeBron, It's kind of act up that you're trying to leave because L A paid you $600 million and it's like that was literally the highest offer and you chose that one, right? And so I think we've got in this situation where the players you didn't have negotiated for the people of the bottom of league to say, Hey, they get you know, all these benefits and all these things which like, fine. But the cost is if you're good and your top of things, like now you have these weird scenarios where yeah, you're gonna get locked in these contracts. You don't want to be like you have all this power that you can't exert but that that's actually a players in your problem, like you have the wrong union representatives in charge. If that's really what you think, because you should be negotiating for something else to give you the second order benefits of what you're seeking, I would agree 100% and I think that was well stated. I mean My other thought to this to before we wrap this up is if you look at the spectrum of all sports right recently in basketball, we've seen player empowerment more than any other sport, many other. Any other professional North American sports like these guys, basically can dictate what they do at any given time, especially if they're really good player. You don't really see that in any other major sport. I mean, occasionally you'll see that pop up here and there like you just start with the NFL, this, uh, past year with Stafford. Um, but you don't really see too many players like forcibly trying to dictate the terms and what is going to specifically happen. So I don't really think I don't really. I don't think there's a good way to solve it, but I would say it's most prevalent in the MBA with the MBA. Yeah, yeah, I mean, I think that's generally true. I mean, baseball obviously doesn't have a salary cap, and I don't think we hear about this as often. Partly because of that, Um, you know, the NFL has a bit of it, and it certainly, you know, there's There's exactly examples of like Brett Farve. And you know what? Not but like, you know, even when you break down a lot of those specific examples like Brett Farve literally retired and then unretired and was mad that a starting position was given up. Then he requested a trade right like that's actually fundamentally different than than a lot of these situations. And so I mean, I think I blame a little bit of a U and then obviously social media where you know, these guys were playing fortnight. They played in a you together. And so like, why wouldn't you want to play together? Like I get that? It's just like that? Your the way that the union contracts are structured is like that. They're not expecting people from Boston to be friends with people from L. A and want to team up and talk every night like it's just sort of a different world. And so I think a different financial structure could get their incentive. So e, I think that's a good point. You know, the last thing I'll say is that I mean, you see the terms of the contract in front of you before you sign it you also going in before sending the contract, knowing and understanding that things can develop over the next five years. So I think in signing that contract, you kind of also made a commitment to some degree to take on whatever those changes might be. Yep.

C
13 days ago

Best of Persona (NBA) - Chad Wittman

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